Kelly M. Naugle

Assistant Professor

Phone:
(317) 274-0601
Fax:
(317) 278-2041
Email:
kmnaugle@iupui.edu
Department:
Kinesiology

Résumé/CV

NIFS IF112
IU School of Physical Education and Tourism Management - IUPUI
901 W. New York Street, Ste. 250
Indianapolis, IN
46202

Education

  • Ph.D., Health and Human Performance, University of Florida
  • M.S. in Physical Education, Sport, and Exercise Science, Ball State University
  • M.A., Clinical Psychology, University of Indianapolis
  • B.S., Psychology, University of Indianapolis

Biography

Dr. Naugle joined the faculty at IUPUI in 2014 after completing a post-doctoral fellowship with the Pain Research and Intervention Center of Excellence at the University of Florida from 2011 to 2014. She received her PHD in 2010 from the University of Florida (UF) in Health and Human Performance with a concentration in Biobehavioral science. After obtaining her PhD, she accepted a one year Research Scientist position at the Institute on Aging at UF. Dr Naugle also has a Master’s degree in Physical Education, Sport and Exercise Science from Ball State University, and a Master’s and Bachelor degree in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis. Dr. Naugle is currently the Director of the Pain and Physical Activity Laboratory in the Department of Kinesiology. Dr. Naugle’s research interests include understanding age-related deleterious changes in pain processing and facilitating the development of behavioral interventions which can target the mechanisms known to be dysfunctional. In particular her work currently focuses on the impact of physical activity behavior and exercise as a therapeutic and preventative strategy for pain related conditions. The lab also uses quantitative sensory testing to understand central and peripheral mechanisms of behavioral interventions for pain. Dr Naugle has published in the following journals Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, Pain, Journal of Pain , Pain Medicine Behavioral Brain Research and the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research with research and invited presentations at multiple national conferences. 

Courses Taught

  • HPER-P 417 Physical Activity and Disease Prevention and Treatment
  • HPER-K 500 Special Topics in Kinesiology Adherence to Physical Activity

Publications

  • Naugle, K.M., Cruz-Almeida, Y., Vierck, C., Mauderli, A., Riley III, J.L. (2015). Age-related differences in conditioned pain modulation of sensitizing and desensitizing trends during response dependent stimulation. Behavioral Brain Research, 289:61-68.
  • Cruz-Almeida, Y., Naugle, K.M., Vierck, C., Fillingim, R.B., Riley III, J.L. (2015). Reliability of pain intensity clamping using response-dependent thermal stimulation in healthy volunteers. BMC Neuroscience, 16(1):21.
  • Fawver, B., Beatty, G.F., Naugle, K.M., Hass, C.J., Janelle, C.M. (2015). Emotional state impacts center of pressure displacement before forward gait initiation. Journal of Applied Biomechanics, 31:35-40.
  • Naugle, K.M., Naugle, K.E., Fillingim, R.B., & Riley III, J.L. (2014). Isometric exercise as a test of pain modulation: Effects of pain modality, psychological variables, and sex. Pain Medicine, 12(4):692-701.
  • Naugle, K.M., Naugle, K.E., Fillingim, R.B., Samuels, B., & Riley III, J.L. (2014). Intensity thresholds for aerobic exercise-induced hypoalgesia. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(4):817-25.
  • Naugle, K.M. & Riley III, J.L. (2014). Self-reported physical activity predicts pain inhibitory and facilitatory function. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 46(3):622-9.
  • Naugle, K.E., Naugle, K.M., Wikstrom, E. (2014). Cardiovascular outcomes of active gaming: Using the Wii as a Cardiovascular Training Tool. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 28(2):443-51.
  • Naugle, K.M. Cruz-Almeida, Y., Fillingim, R.B., & Riley III, J.L. (2013). Offset Analgesia is reduced in older adults. Pain, 154(11): 2381-7.
  • Naugle, K.M., Fillingim, R.B., & Riley III, J.L. (2012). A meta-analytic review of the hypoalgesic effects of exercise. The Journal of Pain, 13(12): 1390-50.
  • Naugle, K.M., Higgins, T.J., Manini, T.M. (2012). Obesity and use of compensatory strategies to perform common daily activities in pre-clinically disabled older adults, Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 54, 134-8.

Research Interests

Dr. Naugle’s research interests include understanding age-related deleterious changes in pain processing and facilitating the development of behavioral interventions which can target the mechanisms known to be dysfunctional. In particular, her work currently focuses on the impact of physical activity behavior and exercise as a therapeutic and preventative strategy for pain related conditions. The lab also uses quantitative sensory testing to understand central and peripheral mechanisms of behavioral interventions for pain.

Current Projects

  • IUPUI Physical Education and Tourism Management School Research Committee, 2014-2015
  • IUPUI Physical Education and Tourism Management School Graduate and  
  • Research Committee, 2014-2015
  • IUPUI University Commencement Marshall, 2014-2015
  • IUPUI PETM School Commencement Marshall, 2014-2015

Honors & Awards

  • American Pain Society’s Young Investigator Travel Award 2012
  • Institute for Learning in Retirement at Oak Hammock Aging Research Award 2013
  • Older Americans Independence Centers Pepper-affiliated Scholar, Institute on Aging, University of Florida, 2013
  • National Institute of Health’s Loan Repayment Program Recipient 2014

Grants & Funding

  • The temporal stability of conditioned pain modulation and temporal summation of pain among healthy older adults; 5/15-5/16; IUPUI Developing Diverse Researchers with InVestigative Expertise (DRIVE); This proposal will evaluate the temporal stability of psychophysical tests designed to assess ascending facilitation of pain (temporal summation of pain) and descending inhibition of pain (conditioned pain modulation) in healthy older adults. Role: PI
  • Role of physical activity behavior and physical fitness in dysregulated pain modulation in healthy older adults; 11/14-11/15; IUPUI School of Physical Education and Tourism Management Faculty Research Opportunity Grant; This proposal will test the central hypothesis that a sedentary lifestyle and decreased physical fitness contribute to the dysregulated pattern of pain modulation (increased pain facilitation, decreased pain inhibition) associated with aging. Role: PI
  • Enhanced Mentoring Program with Opportunities for Ways to Excel in Research Grant; IUPUI Office of Vice Chancellor for Research; The EMPOWER program supports achievement of excellence in research and scholarly activities through sustained mentorship opportunities. Role: Mentee
  • Exercise as therapy for Fibromyalgia: Tests of Central and Peripheral Mechanisms; PI: JL Riley 3rd 12/12-12-14; University of Florida College of Dentistry Seed Grant Award; The overall aims of this project is to test a customized exercise intervention on patients with widespread pain (FMS) or a regional pain condition, myofacial pain (MPD), and to track biopsychosocial markers throughout and following the intervention. Role: Co-Investigator  
  • Integrative and Translational Training in Pain Research 8/11- 08/14; PI: R. Yezierski; NIH T32 NS045551; To prepare future pain researchers in an understanding of biological and psychosocial complexity of pain and develop the skills and abilities to implement multidisciplinary, integrative, translational approaches. Role: Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Emotional influences on posture and gait in Parkinson Disease 9/1/09–9/1/10; North American Society for Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity Graduate Student Research Grant; The aim of this project was to determine the influence of different emotional states on the speed of movement initiation, the quality of postural adjustments during gait initiation, and step execution in individuals with Parkinson Disease and healthy older adults. Role: PI  
  • The effect of active gaming on cardiovascular outcomes Spring 2015; IUPUI Center for Research and Learning Undergraduate Research Opportunities Grant (UROP); Student: Dania Aqeel; Role: Mentor

Presentations

  • “Pain in older adults: Predictors, Functional Consequences, and Considerations for Treatment.” Symposium at the 34th Annual American Pain Society Scientific Meeting 2015. Palm Springs, CA.  
  • “Pain in older adults: Predictors, Functional Consequences, and Considerations for Treatment.” Symposium at the 34th Annual American Pain Society Scientific Meeting 2015. Palm Springs, CA.  
  • Naugle KM, Naugle KE, Riley JL III (2015). Dysfunction of endogenous pain inhibition following acute aerobic exercise in healthy older adults. 34th Annual American Pain Society Scientific Meeting 2015. Palm Springs, CA.  
  • Naugle KE, Chang S, Parr J, Naugle KM (2014). The influence of fear of pain on activity-induced exacerbation of delayed onset muscle pain. 33th Annual American Pain Society Scientific Meeting 2014. Tampa, FL.  
  • Naugle KM, Cruz-Almeida Y, Fillingim R, Staud R, Riley JL III. (2014). Age differences in the temporal summation and after-sensations of the perceived size of pain. 33th Annual American Pain Society Scientific Meeting 2014. Tampa, FL.  
  • Aguirre M, Naugle KM, Cruz-Almeida Y, Riley JL III. (2014). Age differences in habituation to prolonged noxious heat stimulation. 33th Annual American Pain Society Scientific Meeting 2014, Tampa, FL.  
  • Naugle KM, Samuels B, Naugle KE, Riley JR III (2014). Age-related differences in the magnitude of aerobic exercise-induced hypoalgesia for pressure and heat pain. American College of Sports Medicine 61st Annual Meeting 2014, Orlando, FL.  
  • Naugle KE, Change S, Naugle KM, Parr J (2014). Active Wii Gaming reduces exercise induced muscle pain.American College of Sports Medicine 61st Annual Meeting 2014, Orlando, FL.  
  • Wanigatunga AA, Higgins TJ, Marsiske M, Naugle KM, Manini TM. (2014). Comparison of traditional and task-specific exercise on anxiety and self-efficacy beliefs of performing daily tasks. American College of Sports Medicine 61st Annual Meeting 2014, Orlando, FL.  
  • Naugle, K.M., Riley III, J.L. (2013). Self-reported physical activity predicts pain inhibitory and facilitatory function. 32nd Annual American Pain Society Scientific Meeting 2013, New Orleans, LA.  
  • Naugle, KE, Change, SD, Parr, JJ, Naugle, KM. (2013). Active gaming as treatment for delayed onset muscle soreness. 32nd Annual American Pain Society Scientific Meeting 2013, New Orleans, LA.  
  • Naugle, K.M., Naugle, K.E., Samuels, B., Riley III, J.L. (2013). Intensity thresholds for aerobic exercise-induced hypoalgesia to pressure, prolonged thermal, and temporal summation pain responses. American College of Sports Medicine 60th Annual Meeting 2013, Indianapolis, IN.  
  • Chang, SD, Naugle KM, Parr JJ, Naugle KE. (2013). Comparing Interventions for delayed onset muscle soreness in college-aged subjects: Nintendo Wii boxing, Ice, and light concentric exercise. 2013 National Athletic Trainers Association Annual Meeting. Las Vegas, NV.  
  • Naugle, K.M., Mauderli, A.P., King, C.D., Riley III, J.L. (2012). Age differences in offset analgesia of thermal pain. 31st Annual American Pain Society Scientific Meeting 2012, Honolulu, HI. 

Other Activities

  • Ad-Hoc Reviewer, Experimental Brain Research
  • Ad-Hoc Reviewer, Aging Clinical and Experimental Research
  • Ad-Hoc Reviewer, Clinical Biomechanics
  • Ad-Hoc Reviewer, The Gerontologist
  • Ad-Hoc Reviewer, Pain
  • Ad-Hoc Reviewer, Motor Control
  • Ad-Hoc Reviewer, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
  • Ad-Hoc Reviewer, Clinical Journal of Pain
  • Ad-Hoc Reviewer, Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
  • Ad-Hoc Reviewer, Journal of Pain